Summer Reading List for Teens and Tweens

Hey GirlMoguls – we know you need to feed your need for pool and beach reads…especially if you’ve already worked your way through Twilight and the Hunger games. We think the  The Order of Odd-Fish, by James Kennedy and the Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place sound the most interesting.  Tell us your favorite reads below…

Bri Johnson’s Secret Reading List for Tweens and Teens : KiDOinfo ….

kidoinfo.com7/18/12

We’re familiar with the current, most popular books for American tweens and teens (Twilight, The Hunger Games, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and The Lightning Thief, for example). This summer, discover some lesser-known titles

 

Happy Reading!

Tween GirlMogul Books

Do you have a tween?  Then you know they are unique breed onto themselves.  And we have books for them….

 

Saving Hannah  – Or How to Rewrite History – Amazon.com Best Seller – An engaging teen novel by Andrea Stein, Saving Hannah is the sort of book that encourages girls to think beyond reality television and fruit-flavored lip-gloss. Meet Rose, her parents decide to start an organic farm, which transplants her from Manhattan to rural Weston. She’s not happy about this until she takes part in a contest sponsored by the Atlas Institute for Leadership-the grand prize is a trip to New York City. Her teammates in the challenge are Poppy, a science geek, Daisy, a bad girl gamer, and Lily, an overachieving know-it-all. With her eye on the Big Apple, Rose recovers a diary in the library that clears a founding member of Weston of wrongdoings and learns that each of her new gal pals brings something to the table to outsmart the mayor, rival teams, and the cagey Dr. Smith who concocted the entire contest as a plot that’s anything but civic-minded. This debut is first in a series about their girl power adventures.
Ages 9-12.      Buy Now at Amazon.com – eBook or Paperbook

 

 

Goal Setting for Kids – Girl Power Rules – Inspiration and Motivation for Tweens – In Girl Power Rules, Goal Setting for Kids, tween girls will be taken on an exciting journey, meeting successful women – none of whom are celebrities, rock stars or actors. Instead these real, successful women have started businesses, founded causes and started movements. And they will inspire tween girls to do the same. Plus, the book has the Get Goaling workbook, a step by step goal setting guide for kids that will help your daughter dream big and craft a plan of action.  Buy Now at Amazon.com…$3.99

Kids and Homework – Ending the Homework Wars

As a parent, you know that homework is important for tweens – after all, this is the time when the stakes at school amp up – and setting the foundation for good study habits is crucial.  But getting this high energy to sit still can be a real challenge.  If you feel at a loss about how you can help your kids with homework, here are some some tips that may ease the homework challenges.

Kids-and-homeworkKids and Homework – Not an Oxymoron

1. Schedule it in

Let your kids know that you think homework is important by scheduling it in. One way to do that is to have a designated “homework time.” This kind of routine can be very helpful for kids, and also establishes homework as an important task with its own allotted time.

Having a designated homework time also gives you more flexibility. That may seem ironic, but you and your child get to decide how many hours are needed, and what time of day those hours can come out of.  Involve your tween in the decision as well – this can be very motivational – and makes it less about the parent telling the child what to do and more about the child working with you to solve a problem.

Another tip about the scheduling – consider setting aside an “academic time” rather than just “homework time.” For example, if your child knows he or she has to spend an hour doing something learning-related, he or she will probably be less likely to hurry carelessly through a homework assignment just to get it done.  If she finishes homework early she must still use the rest of the time for academic “stuff” – not getting to watch TV or surf the Internet.
2. Check it over

Make it a routine to look over your kids’ homework assignments. You don’t have to nit-pick, but just see that the homework is completed and that there are no glaringly obvious errors.

3. Get to know the teacher

Try to find out your child’s teacher’s expectations regarding homework, so that you can help your child reach those specific goals. It may be surprising how much teachers can differ in their homework expectations.

4. Quiet time

Homework/academic time should be free from noisy distractions if at all possible. Don’t settle down with homework assignments near the telephone, television, or computer, for instance (unless the homework assignment requires research on the computer).  At the same time, most tweens still need some guidance when doing their homework  – so sending them to their room unsupervised is not a good idea.  If younger siblings are around, have them do something quiet at the same time.

5. Quiet place

Choose a special place for homework. Your tween will look forward to her homework nook if it’s set up right. While guarding against distractions, you can set up the area to have snacks, drinks (even a mini fridge), comfy chairs or cushions, a special desk or table, and so forth.

 

Andrea Stein is a tween parenting expert and girl power coach.  Check out the GirlMoguls – a New Adventure Series for Tween Girls here: http://girlmogul.com/buy-the-girlmogul-book/

Building Self-Esteem in Children

Like any mom, you only want the best for your child.   By building self-esteem in your children.  Sometimes this is easier said than done.  The following tips will help you develop self-esteem in children, so they can have a rich and fulfilling life.

Tip 1:  Be Confident Yourself. Show your children you are a confident person in a variety of situations.     Show your tweens that it’s important to try new things, even if you don’t always succeed.  When they see you being confident in your abilities, no matter the outcome, that postitive attitude will boost their self-esteem.

Tip 2: Develop Your Child’s Sense  Responsibility – Another good way to build self-esteem in children is to give them some age-appropriate tasks they are responsible for on a regular basis.  Create routines in which they are regularly asked to perform these tasks. By asking your children to perform chores , they will recognize and appreciate your confidence in their growing abilities and your trust in them will build their esteem.

Tip 3: Spread the Praise Around- Tweens need as much praise as younger children.  However you need to be more selective in how you do it.  Praising every little thing your child does can give them the feeling they can do no wrong.    Instead, praise their passing skills or another specific aspect of their performance.  This way they can take pride in their own achievements and realize that doing their best is more important than just winning or losing.   This will allow them to better handle the inevitable disappointments  that are a natural part of life.

Tip 4: Listen Up – Listen to your children.  This is especially important as your children become tweens.  By listening you show your children that what they have to say matters and is important.   You may have to listen to a lot of  chatter before they really start opening, but it will be worth it.  Eventually they will learn its ok to express their emotions, frustrations and fears to you.  Support them, empathize, but also don’t be afraid to correct them when they’re wrong.

These suggestions for building self-esteem in children will be the starting point of a whole new relationship with your tween.